A very big newbie :)

 
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Jeraych



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:47 am    Post subject: A very big newbie :) Reply with quote

well, I am very much a newbie, not a very big newbie, I dont really weigh that much... at ANY rate... here is my question(s).

First off, I am trying to figure out which language to use to start working on a mud with... (i will need to learn them obviously), either A.) PYTHON, or B.) C++ ... now i like the syntax of Python, and the way it looks, not sure about C++ though. any suggestions would be helpful Smile


Secondly, I would love for everyone to give me projects to work on.. I seem to work better if I have goals to work towards (smaller to larger) hehe.

Thanks for the help!!
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eiz



Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 152
Location: Florida

PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why limit yourself to either Python or C++? If those are the only options you're considering (and I have no idea why), Python is probably a more appropriate choice. Generally speaking, unless you need extremely high performance or low level control, systems languages like C++ are unnecessary.

Personally, I'd recommend C# or a good functional language (C# 2.0 qualifies as a half-assed functional language), but practically speaking you should use whatever language you're most proficient with.
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Jimorie



Joined: 18 May 2005
Posts: 10
Location: Gothenbrg, Sweden

PostPosted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 3:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The big difference between Python and C++ is that Python is interpreted and C++ is not. This means that a Python program will always require an additional interpreter program to run, while a C++ program is compiled to machine code and run independently. For this reason, C++ gives you better performance while Python should offer you nice things like runtime error handling, garbage collection and other things that make your life as a programmer easier. (I don't code Python, so I am just assuming here!)

So if you do not plan to create a MUD that should be able to handle hundreds or thousands of online users, I'd recommend Python. And that is without even knowing the language. Python should be the easiest of the two to get started with.

For other alternatives, I'd point you at DGD or ColdC. I believe these are very good for creating MUDs, but probably more difficult to find documentation and other material on.
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ide



Joined: 21 Feb 2006
Posts: 105
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 3:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Given that you'll want to learn 'to program', not just programming languages, you might want to just pick a codebase you like and learn some of that language first. You'll get introduced to a lot of basic concepts while having a project to work on.


http://www.norvig.com/21-days.html


(don't take that link the wrong way, it's just a good article to look at)
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Massaria



Joined: 14 May 2005
Posts: 31
Location: Denmark

PostPosted: Tue Feb 21, 2006 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you're a newbie to coding, want to do something more than applying snippets and haven't got genious-level IQ, you should definitely skip any variant of C. It will most likely discourage you.

If you like Python, go with that. I'd recommend looking over Ruby and TeensyMUD first though.

Homework:
Do a simple database with a menu or two (new entry, update entry, exit etc). Entries should save to a file, of course.
Once that is done, you are probably ready to start some light mud-coding (extentions/modifications).

Good luck (as if such a thing exists in coding)
Mass.
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Jeraych



Joined: 20 Feb 2006
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 5:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok Ok, I am not a newbie to coding...

First language I learned was Perl, then went to PHP and Sql, have dabbled with Java and VB, Euphoria too, Rebol, and god knows what other languages. But those links and such look nice! I am looking into them!
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Tyche



Joined: 13 May 2005
Posts: 176
Location: Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeraych wrote:
Ok Ok, I am not a newbie to coding...

First language I learned was Perl, then went to PHP and Sql, have dabbled with Java and VB, Euphoria too, Rebol, and god knows what other languages. But those links and such look nice! I am looking into them!


If interested in Ruby...

Learn to Program
Introduction to Ruby
Learning Ruby
BCT's Ruby Tutorial
Why’s (Poignant) Guide to Ruby
Programming Ruby: The Pragmatic Programmer's Guide
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