Crafting recipes and system efficiency

 
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Grem



Joined: 15 May 2005
Posts: 36
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:10 am    Post subject: Crafting recipes and system efficiency Reply with quote

Choose between one of the following systems and provide input on why it would work best/worst, or add your own idea.


Player types 'craft' command ...

A. MUD looks through all items in player's inventory and displays items that he can craft by checking every possible recipe in the MUD and reviewing if he is carrying neccessary components for each craft.

B. MUD searches through all of player's 'known' recipes and displays recipe list to the player. The player can then select a recipe to view required components.

C. Each item in the player's inventory has a linked list that points to the various recipes that the item is a part of. The player is displayed a list of recipes that items in his inventory are valid components for.

D. Players are not displayed a list of recipes, but instead must mix/match items together by experimenting. Item structures contain a list of valid combinations with other items.

E. Player 'uses' a recipe that is in his inventory and he crafts the product if he is carrying the items required listed on the recipe.
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Lindahl



Joined: 29 May 2005
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 4:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

F. The player browses an online reference manual for crafting (coupled with a quick-reference lookup).

I guess this would be mostly similiar to your suggested E. Typically players want to know how to craft a particular item. They rarely want to know what they can craft with the contents of their inventory. The quality of the produced item should probably be based on skills associated with the craft, as well as the quality of the materials used - therefore it shouldn't really matter that the players know how to craft everything. If you want to incorporate some sort of IC, don't let players see crafts they don't have sufficient skill in. You still have to deal with cross-character knowledge for a single player, of course, but at least the player can use this list as a guide for what the character should know.
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Baeran



Joined: 16 May 2005
Posts: 15
Location: On your lawn.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 4:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The way I was going to do it would basically make it all based of a subset of skills like metalworking and woodworking. Then maybe you could get some specialty stuff in there to give bonuses to certain things, like weaponsmithing.

Really though if you know how to do metalwork then making basic armor isnt a horribly complicated thing. Now to specialize in it and make a superioir product would require quite a bit of practice etc. So I am basing my system around a few basic skills, as I said: woodworking, metalworking, proabably something with leather or hides and something with cloth or sewing.

This opens it up to let you make most anything really the only variable then is what you make it out of. So a main factor in my system is the materials used to make the item. Then you get a bit more of a bonus if you are specialized in the field of what you are making.

I havent completely decided how the interface will work yet but it will probably be along the lines of: craft (material) (type) and if necessary (location). Location will be a bit stupid for weapons, which will generally be in the hand. For example though, craft iron sword, would take into account your skill at metalworking, see if you had a specialty in weapons or ironworking, then grab a chunk of iron and try to make a sword. I may even work in that people who are good at it use less iron or whatever they are using as a material also.

The items that it spits out will be pretty standard like you would get "an iron sword" or maybe a Diablo-like "a superior iron sword". Customization of items will be something that requires the spending of other things.

Anyways thats my take on it. Never liked the idea of having a skill for each thing you wanted to make or any of that business. Anyone with a reasonable knowledge of the basics could *attempt* to make whatever they wanted, just might look like poo Very Happy .

Edit - Just thought I would add that the reason behind my crafting system being so open is because a very very large portion of items will be player made. None of this NPC with an endless supply of "a fine silver dagger."
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Wilkes



Joined: 30 May 2005
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the examples you've given above all work pretty close to equally well, it just depends upon the type and purpose of the game you're running. Along with the sort of skills/activities you want associated with a certain feature.

For instance, if you want your MUD to attract the playertypes that enjoy exploring, experimenting and optimizing, you might consider D) due to the fact that it opens up a lot of the options mentioned above. However, it also requires a lot more effort on the part of the players in exploring and experimenting, so unless a lot of your MUD is based around these concepts, this system might end up underused by players. Or, someone would just create an F) as mentioned by a previous poster, which could remove both exploring and experimenting from the list, at least minorly.

A, B, and C all seem to just diffrentiate in the manner in which the information is displayed. It's simply an implementation call, since they all lead to the same system. Player knowing exactly what to craft, and how to craft it.

I'm assuming that E requires the player to have found the recipe in the first place, which may have required a bit of exploring and possibly a bit of questing on the part of the player. So, if that was something you wanted to integrate into your system, this particular example could also work well.

Moving onto the question of which idea I'd use, I'd most likely use a modified version of D, which provides some basic references as to the major craftables (similar to Lindahl's F), but with the capabilities of adding more powerful affects to certain crafted items the more you learn about the inner workings of the system and the more materials you find to experiment with. But then again I prefer experimentation and optimization in my games as opposed to simply typing craft sword and being given a shortsword.
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Ashon



Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 86
Location: Seattle

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
D. Players are not displayed a list of recipes, but instead must mix/match items together by experimenting. Item structures contain a list of valid combinations with other items.


I think that D and F will end up working together. Unless you use a system that has been described by Kelson in: Custom Design Spells

So that while using material A, alchemy Compound B, Heat Source C, Skill Level D, and undefinable quanity E (The Differences between players) the output is different.

I wouldn't go drastically different. But say Bubba uses the above to create a sword. and Then Boffo uses the same. Boffo creates a sword too. But they may manifest different qualities. Sharpness, weight distribution, latent magical energies. So forth and so on. Small difference that will make the items different, but not drastically different.
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Pheralan



Joined: 19 May 2005
Posts: 13
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd say a mix between B and D. Making it so that your players have to find the recipe first through trial and error, but once they have it, the game keeps track of the fact that they know it. i.e. You pick up item a and item b. You experiment a bit and find it makes item C if you work a and b together. Now that you know this combination, the game keeps track of A+B=C so you don't have to write it down.

Also note: With the above sort of system, you're going to run into Lindahl's F as well, though not via the staff. The players are going to write these things down and post them on personal webpages, the same way people did spells/mage trainers for Godwars back w/ the original mage code, or with quest directions for the same codebase. People will use these resources, because it's easier...perhaps not as fun, but easier.
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